Inclusion in the Toy Box - Why Does it Matter?

Diversity and inclusion are hugely important for children growing up. Kids want to see themselves reflected in the toys they play with - childhood should be an inclusive place, where every child belongs regardless of gender, ethnicity or ability.

Wildlife Photographer Mia, one of the new stars of the Lottie Dolls line-up, is the first ever fashion doll that wears a cochlear implant. The doll is the first time a doll manufacturer has mass produced a doll wearing a cochlear implant, with the introduction of Wildlife Photographer Mia, Arklu the maker of Lottie Dolls hope to provide options to the general public to normalise the representation of people with different abilities in the toys that they play with.

 

Although Mia wears a cochlear implant, this is simply a small part of her story, rather than a focal point. A keen photographer, the Mia character also has a mission to encourage children to take an interest in nature and wildlife.

Mia was created following consultation with 'Toy Like Me', a UK non-profit who campaign for diversity in the toy-box and for better representation of disabilities so that differently-abled children can see themselves reflected in the toys they play with. ToyLikeMe was set up in 2015 by former BBC journalist and children's writer, Rebecca Atkinson, who wears hearing aids herself.



When I was growing up in the 80s,” says Rebecca Atkinson, of 'Toy Like Me', who wears hearing aids herself, “I never saw any deaf characters in toys, books or on TV. When I became a mum myself, I decided it was time things changed. I wanted the global toy industry to act, to better represent the 150 million children worldwide with disability and difference.

 

“This Mia doll is my childhood dream come true,” says Rebecca, “I’m so happy, I’m like a kid at Christmas! I hope it will help many deaf children grow positive self-esteem to see their experiences included by the mainstream toy industry.”  

Psychologist Dr Sian Jones from Goldsmiths, University of London has studied the effects of playing with toys with disabilities on the attitudes of non-disabled children. Interviewing hundreds of children, she found that after playing with toys like the Mia doll, children were more open to forming friendships with peers with disability and difference.



Mia the Wildlife Photographer has been acknowledged in the International Design Awards, receiving both an Honourable Mention and a Silver. "A great product has the potential to be life changing. It can be simultaneously beautiful and innovative, useful and creative, designed to solve a problem, make life easier or simply spread joy. At the International Design Awards, we want to reward the strategic thinking and imagination which goes into making a product which will be used, valued and perhaps even loved by its target market."



Lottie Dolls celebrated their 5th anniversary this year by announcing that, going forward, kids will be contributing to the design of every doll via their monthly design competition. For more information visit our competition Inspired by Real Kids Competition webpage!

 

 

                                      

 

 

About Lottie

www.lottie.com // @lottie_dolls

Lottie Dolls start at RRP: €19.95 // £18.99 // $19.95

 

Lottie dolls, an Irish doll company who believe that childhood should be an inclusive place where every child belongs regardless of gender, ethnicity or ability and aim to reflect that in their collection. Developed alongside academics in child development, unlike other dolls, Lottie Finn and Friends are based on nine-year-old children, the dolls are therefore relatable to all the elements of childhood – Lottie’s motto is Be Bold, Be Brave, Be You!

 

Six of the Lottie products to date have been inspired by ideas from real children from around the world. When launching Lottie, the vision was to create a range of dolls that would empower children to be themselves, to be imaginative and adventurous and - most of all – to have fun!

 

Lottie Dolls are now on sale in over 30 countries and here, on www.lottie.com

Tree House
Forest Friend Lottie
Treehouse Adventure Bundle

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3 comments

  • I love this!! I was made aware of deaf issues when I watched the show switched at birth, and I realise how much I didn’t know. Since then I’ve started donating to a deaf charity and trying to keep a few simple words of sign language in my vocabulary. Inclusion is enriching, I worked with people with learning difficulties and it was the most rewarding job I’ve ever had. Exhausting, but worth it!! I learnt such a lot from many of them as individuals, including helping me to be a better person. Keep up the great work – perhaps your next doll could be one with down syndrome?

    Nathalie on
  • Beautiful idea…anything that helps children to understand disabilty in other children is a step in the right direction .well done .xxx

    Jackie Irving on
  • I love your idea of making dolls for children with disabilities and cochlear ear plants, it’s Beautiful for children to connect as sometimes they can feel isolated,diversity is good. thank you.

    Tink on

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